evansomething:

Thank you, college bathroom graffiti.

evansomething:

Thank you, college bathroom graffiti.

Reblogged from morituri te salutant

lonelymountainorbust:

im not heterophobic my parents r straight

Reblogged from zach from the internet
yaoikusama:

ateliertovar:

artistic-depictions:

Diana, the Huntress, Gaston Casimir Saint-Pierre, 1833-1916, oil on canvas

summer looks

little huntress things

yaoikusama:

ateliertovar:

artistic-depictions:

Diana, the Huntress, Gaston Casimir Saint-Pierre, 1833-1916, oil on canvas

summer looks

little huntress things

Tags: art dogs

zchr:

it’s a metaphor

Reblogged from zach from the internet
Tags: nsfw the best

kineticpenguin:

If you think about it, we’re the weirdos living at the bottom of 300 miles of fluid. Deep sky creatures, trolling the bottom of the air floor for nutrients and mates.

joiuu:

Kinda old but a pile of angry cat heads is always relevant.

joiuu:

Kinda old but a pile of angry cat heads is always relevant.

Tags: art cats
Reblogged from MAXIMUM WEBINAR
atomicpowered:

atomicpowered:

had to paint something nice for the revival of one of my favorite shows ever

please look at this i tried very hard

atomicpowered:

atomicpowered:

had to paint something nice for the revival of one of my favorite shows ever

please look at this i tried very hard

Reblogged from Rider Kick
anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

roachpatrol:

atoms2ashes:

Madoka Magica witches in Collage form, including Gertrud, Charlotte, Elly, and Elsa Maria.

That was fun. I might do this again sometime with the other witches.

first of all how dare you

Tags: art madoka pmmm

dickensianwerewolf:

The other reproductive rights:

  1. The right to not be sterilized against your knowledge
  2. The right to not be sterilized against your will
  3. The right to not be coerced into sterilizing yourself in order to gain citizenship, relief from imprisonment, change a gender marker, etc.
  4. The right to determine how you will give birth
  5. Placeholder for rights regarding adoption which I don’t have the ability or energy to articulate right now
  6. The right to not be forced/coerced/tricked into selling your child? How about that one?

tiorickyaoi:

"i need a movie where there are kickass female characters"image

"i need a movie where the main characters aren’t attractive"image

"i need a movie with annoying talking animals"

image

"i need a movie where the main character lives in a swamp"

image

"i need a movie that has all star by smash mouth on the soundtrack"

image

Reblogged from MAXIMUM WEBINAR
I met my wife at a Star Trek convention. She was study abroad from France and spoke little English, and I didn’t know a lick of French. So, for the first few months of our relationship, we communicated by speaking Klingon.

Hear more tales of nerdery in this week’s Pwn Up! (via dorkly)

Okay I’m not even a Star Trek fan but that’s beautiful.

(via tchy)

Reblogged from morituri te salutant
Tags: context

exeggcute:

you meet your wife and your native languages are different but you both know a made-up alien language and use that until you speak something else in common—call me a nerd but that’s precious

Reblogged from morituri te salutant

curious-wiccan:

Norwegian forest cat chasing a fox

curious-wiccan:

Norwegian forest cat chasing a fox

Reblogged from rejoice
Tags: cats foxes